50 Nonclinical Careers for Physicians: a book review

If you’re burnt out from Covid and contemplating exploring nonclinical options, this book is for you. 50 Nonclinical Careers for Physicians is full of information on finding fulfilling, meaningful, and lucrative alternatives to direct patient care.

Books and Hikes are good for the soul. (Reader: please be aware there are Amazon affiliate links, that if you click, although they will not result in higher prices for you, could result in a commission that would go towards supporting this blog.)

Dr. Sylvie Stacy wrote a much more comprehensive, and up-to-date book than this book review I did here. Physicians in Transition was a dated compilation of twenty-five interviews with physicians who quit clinical medicine and explored other ventures as ways to not only make money, but find more fulfilling careers.

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Physicians in Transition: Doctors Who Successfully Reinvented Themselves (A Book Review)

“It is unlikely that your actual path through life will match the exact journey you had in mind when you set out. It makes no sense to restrict your satisfaction to one scenario when there are many paths to success.” – Atomic Habits

Fascinating read (Editor’s note: Please be aware there can be affiliate links in this blog, while bringing no extra charge to you, can provide a commission to support this blog)

This post may sound a bit tone-deaf in our current climate, as it explores physicians leaving clinical medicine. However, this blog was written last fall and is only now seeing publication as I have a one week break in my regular (fiction) writing schedule. And judging by the eye-popping number of “I quit” posts from doctors that I’ve seen recently in my Facebook feed—as well as reading a thought-provoking blog by a pharmacist who’s taking a COVID Sabbatical—I decided to go ahead and publish this post.

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Spending Habits for Professionals Who Want to FIRE: I wrote a book just for you.

Often when a blogger drops off the face of the earth, it’s because something happened, like divorce or else health issues, like a Glioblastoma. For DH (Dear Husband) and I, it’s been something else entirely. Or somethingS else. Over the past few months, I feel like we’ve been barely treading water with massive waves overcoming us. But, like a Chumbawamba song, every time we get knocked down, we’ll get back up again.

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Flying in Peru: Having to spend the night in Lima Airport

Having to spend the night in the Lima airport is actually a thing, so it gets its own blog post. If only I had read up on flying to Machu Picchu before we made plane reservations…it would have saved us a lot of time and energy!

Apparently—I don’t know if this is true or not—there are so many birds around the Cusco airport that it causes a danger to fly in later in the day. So the flights into this sacred Incan city are morning flights. This means you have to spend the night at the Lima airport—or else figure out something else.

Well then. What’s one to do with 6 and 8-year-old boys in tow? If only I knew then what I know now

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10 Reasons Why You Need to Attend a FINCON

Even if you’re not a blogger or podcaster, if you’re a regular reader or listener, it would behoove you to attend at least one FINCON . Here are the reasons why: Continue reading “10 Reasons Why You Need to Attend a FINCON”

A Gap Year Traveling the US and Abroad: thoughts and an itinerary from a family with young children

Last summer, I was a beta tester in a Montana Money Adventures’ class, along with a Coloradoan lady doctor who is half of Wander All Year. We’ve kept in touch while she (and I) both used that class as our springboard for sabbaticals. Now she’s traveling the world with her family.

For anyone who is considering slow travel with a family, this is a great guest post from her husband. It details their thoughts that went into planning a gap year traveling the U.S. and other parts of the world. (And fun fact: the lady doc is the only woman I know who had one set of twins that were born in different years!): Continue reading “A Gap Year Traveling the US and Abroad: thoughts and an itinerary from a family with young children”

The Benefits of Investing in a Solo Parent-Child Trip

You thought the ending to the title was going to be “…Solo 401k” didn’t you? That’s where DH (Dear Husband) thought this was going when I told him about this blog post. I pointed out that a Solo Parent-Child trip is actually more valuable than a 401k. For the myriad reasons why read on in time for a “Mother’s Day” type blog post. Continue reading “The Benefits of Investing in a Solo Parent-Child Trip”

How to Get a Good Price on a Vehicle (Without a Male Accompanying You)

The fact I even have to add that second part onto the title tells you how far our misogynistic society has yet to change. You see, I recently went out and purchased a truck by myself for our family. Posting about this on social media caused quite the flurry. “You went alone? What was that like? How did you do it? Why didn’t your husband go with you—are you guys not getting along?”

This last question is probably still lingering in people’s heads as I’ve been writing this post while traveling in the U.K. with my son (when childcare falls through, you make lemonade. Or change a trip to your sister’s wedding into a mother-son one like I did). So to reiterate what I posted on social media: DH and I are just fine. Actually, we’re better than ever, but that’s a subject of a future post about how awesome FIRE can be for a marriage.

To get back to the matter at hand, it’s possible for a female to not only buy a vehicle by herself but to get an excellent price on it as well.  Continue reading “How to Get a Good Price on a Vehicle (Without a Male Accompanying You)”